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How Will Mortgage Rate Hikes Impact Home Sales?

 

How Will Mortgage Rate Hikes Impact Home Sales?

Posted: 18 Jun 2015 04:00 AM PDT

How Will Mortgage Rate Hikes Impact Home Sales? | Keeping Current MattersWhen mortgage interest rates begin to climb, experts immediately begin to discuss home affordability indexes. They calculate how an increase in rates will slow home purchases as more and more potential buyers are priced out of the market. Today, with home prices also increasing, many believe that home sales may slow down rather dramatically. This may prove to be true in the long term. However, in the short term, increasing mortgage rates may have the opposite effect. Many buyers who have been sitting on the fence may realize that delaying their purchase no longer makes sense. Last week, in a CNBC article, Matt Weaver of Florida-based PMAC Lending explained the impact an increase in rates will have:

"These increases really help the home-buying market. It really gets buyers to really understand that 'wait a minute, rates are at an all-time low, let's react now, let's react before they go higher’.”

As an example, we can look to 2013 when interest rates spiked up by a full percentage point over a two month period. The result is that many buyers rushed to the market on the fear that rates would continue to climb. It didn’t necessarily increase the number of sales that year dramatically. However, it did seem to move some sales up in the year as evidenced by the chart below: Home Sales & Impact of Mortgage Rate Spike | Keeping Current MattersWe can see that the sales cycle did not follow a more normal cycle (2014) with more sales being pushed into July and August and slightly less sales in September and August.

Bottom Line

If you are waiting to put your house on the market, think twice. Now may be the perfect time to sell as buyer competition will continue to heat up as more purchasers jump into the market. You may also save a pretty penny on the monthly mortgage payment of your next home by selling now before rates shoot up.

Source: www.KeepingCurrentMatters.Com


 

 

 

 

 

217,726 Reasons to Buy a Home Now!

 

217,726 Reasons to Buy a Home Now!

Posted: 10 Jun 2015 04:00 AM PDT

217,726 Reasons to Buy a Home Now! | Keeping Current MattersThe inaugural Opportunity Cost Report was released recently by realtor.com. The report explained that “with interest rates and home prices expected to climb in the next year, the financial penalties of delaying or forgoing a home purchase in today's market have become very steep”. The report estimates that, based on today's dollars, the average purchaser would accumulate $217,726 in increased wealth over a 30-year period. (You can get the projected wealth increase for almost 100 metros here.)

What could this mean to someone sitting on the fence waiting to buy?

Experts believe that both home prices and mortgage interest rates will increase over the next twelve months. Obviously, if this does happen, the monthly cost of a home a year from now will be dramatically higher than it is today. The Opportunity Cost Report breaks down exactly how much a purchaser could lose over increments of one year and three years. Here are the results based on an average purchaser in the U.S. delaying their purchase: The Cost of Waiting to Buy | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line

If you are ready, willing and able to buy a home, waiting doesn't make sense.

Source: www.KeepingCurrentMatters.Com


 

 

 

 

 

5 Reasons You Shouldn’t For Sale By Owner

 

5 Reasons You Shouldn’t For Sale By Owner

Posted: 02 Jun 2015 04:00 AM PDT

5 Reasons You Shouldn't For Sale By Owner | Keeping Current MattersIn today's market, with homes selling quickly and prices rising some homeowners might consider trying to sell their home on their own, known in the industry as a For Sale by Owner (FSBO). There are several reasons this might not be a good idea for the vast majority of sellers. Here are five reasons:

1. There Are Too Many People to Negotiate With

Here is a list of some of the people with whom you must be prepared to negotiate if you decide to For Sale By Owner:

  • The buyer who wants the best deal possible
  • The buyer’s agent who solely represents the best interest of the buyer
  • The buyer’s attorney (in some parts of the country)
  • The home inspection companies which work for the buyer and will almost always find some problems with the house.
  • The appraiser if there is a question of value

2. Exposure to Prospective Purchasers

Recent studies have shown that 88% of buyers search online for a home. That is in comparison to only 21% looking at print newspaper ads. Most real estate agents have an internet strategy to promote the sale of your home. Do you?

3. Results Come from the Internet

Where do buyers find the home they actually purchased?

  • 43% on the internet
  • 9% from a yard sign
  • 1% from newspaper

The days of selling your house by just putting up a sign and putting it in the paper are long gone. Having a strong internet strategy is crucial.

4. FSBOing has Become More and More Difficult

The paperwork involved in selling and buying a home has increased dramatically as industry disclosures and regulations have become mandatory. This is one of the reasons that the percentage of people FSBOing has dropped from 19% to 9% over the last 20+ years.

5. You Net More Money when Using an Agent

Many homeowners believe that they will save the real estate commission by selling on their own. Realize that the main reason buyers look at FSBOs is because they also believe they can save the real estate agent’s commission. The seller and buyer can’t both save the commission. Studies have shown that the typical house sold by the homeowner sells for $208,000 while the typical house sold by an agent sells for $235,000. This doesn’t mean that an agent can get $27,000 more for your home as studies have shown that people are more likely to FSBO in markets with lower price points. However, it does show that selling on your own might not make sense.

Bottom Line

Before you decide to take on the challenges of selling your house on your own, sit with a real estate professional in your marketplace and see what they have to offer.


 

 

Homeownership as an Investment: The Role of Price Appreciation

 

Homeownership as an Investment: The Role of Price Appreciation

Posted: 27 May 2015 04:00 AM PDT

Homeownership as an Investment: The Role of Price Appreciation | Keeping Current MattersWe recently posted on the results from the latest Home Price Expectation Survey (HPES) showing where residential home prices are headed over the next five years. Today, we want to show you what the results of the report could mean to you. A good portion of every family’s wealth comes from the equity in the home they live in. As the value of their home (an asset) increases so does their equity. Let’s look at a possible case scenario based on the latest HPES. Here is a chart showing the survey’s projections on annual appreciation over the next five years: Projected Mean Percentage Appreciation | Keeping Current MattersWe then looked at the five-year impact this would have on the equity of a family that purchased a home in January for $250,000: Home Price Appreciation | Keeping Current MattersTheir family wealth (based on increased equity) would increase by $47,772 over those five years. Bottom Line If you don’t yet own, perhaps you should be thinking about purchasing. If you already own, maybe it’s time to move up to enjoy your dream home and also ride the increase in equity of the larger asset.




 

More Home Buyers Putting Less Down

 

More Home Buyers Putting Less Down

Posted: 20 May 2015 04:00 AM PDT

More Home Buyers Putting Less Down | Keeping Current MattersA recent post by the National Association of Realtors (NAR) revealed that in the months of December 2014 through February 2015, there was an increase in the number of first-time buyers making a down payment of 6% or less as compared to last year:

  • 2014: 61% of first time home buyers
  • 2015: 66% of first time home buyers

While the number of small down payments is lower than it was in 2009 when 77% of down payments were 6% or less, it does show the recent decisions by both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to offer 3% down payment options to certain buyers is impacting the market. FHFA Director Mel Watt recently explained why Freddie and Fannie made this decision:

“The new lending guidelines by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will enable creditworthy borrowers who can afford a mortgage, but lack the resources to pay a substantial down payment plus closing costs, to get a mortgage with 3% down. These underwriting guidelines provide a responsible approach to improving access to credit while ensuring safe and sound lending practices.”

This is great news to millions of purchasers that have been denied the opportunity to own their own home because of the almost impossible burden of saving for a 20% down payment.

Will these programs create future challenges?

Certain pundits fear that low down payment programs will create a wave of foreclosures down the road. Mr. Watt also addressed this concern:

“To mitigate risk, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will use their automated underwriting systems, which include compensating factors to evaluate a borrower’s creditworthiness. In addition, the new offerings will also include homeownership counseling, which improves borrower performance. FHFA will monitor the ongoing performance of these loans.”

Also, the Urban Institute revealed data showing what impact substantially lower down payments would have on default rates in today’s mortgage environment. Their study revealed:

“Those who have criticized low-down payment lending as excessively risky should know that if the past is a guide, only a narrow group of borrowers will receive these loans, and the overall impact on default rates is likely to be negligible. This low down payment lending was never more than 3.5 percent of the Fannie Mae book of business, and in recent years, had been even less. If executed carefully, this constitutes a small step forward in opening the credit box—one that safely, but only incrementally, expands the pool of who can qualify for a mortgage.”

Here are the direct links to the guidelines for each program:

Fannie Mae 3% Down Program Freddie Mac 3% Down Program Remember, as with any new program, there will be some confusion. Contact your mortgage professional for a deeper understanding.

Source: KeepingCurrentMatters.com


 

 

 

 

Homeownership Still a great Investment

Homeownership Still a Great Investment

Posted: 07 May 2015 04:00 AM PDT

Homeownership Still a Great Investment | Keeping Current MattersFour recent news articles confirmed that most Americans still see real estate as a great long term investment. The Gallup organization polled the American people and discovered that they believe that real estate is a better long term investment than stocks/mutual funds, gold, savings or bonds: Americans: Real Estate is Best Long Term Investment | Keeping Current MattersA second survey was done by Edelman Berland which showed that: Importance of Real Estate to Long-Term Investing | Keeping Current MattersAt the same time, Tim Rood, chairman of the business advisory firm The Collingwood Group, explained that real estate is:

“…one of the last legitimate wealth creation opportunities…The leveraged return if you put down 10 percent on a house, the trajectory of appreciation lately is you’re going to get your money back inside of a year and then after that 5 to 10 percent appreciation rates. It's phenomenal."

Bottom Line

Real estate continues to be a sensational long term investment. If you need help with any of your real estate needs, contact a local real estate professional and discuss the opportunities available in today’s market. 

 

 

 

 

Easy Chicken Little: Homeownership Rates Are NOT Crashing

 

Easy Chicken Little: Homeownership Rates Are NOT Crashing

Posted: 06 May 2015 04:00 AM PDT

Easy Chicken Little: Homeownership Rates Are NOT Crashing | Keeping Current MattersThe Census recently released their 2015 Q1 Homeownership Statistics, and many began to worry that Americans have taken a step back from the notion of homeownership. The national homeownership rate (Americans who owned vs. rented their primary residence) increased significantly during the housing boom, reaching its peak of 69.2% in 2004. The Census Bureau just reported the first quarter of 2015 ended with a homeownership rate of 63.7%. Many reported on this and began to question Americans’ belief in the ideal of homeownership as a major part of the American Dream.

Everyone Calm Down…

It is true the homeownership rate has fallen over the last several years. However, if you look at the national rate over the last 30 years (1984-2014), you can see that the current homeownership rate has returned closer to historic norms. The 63.7% rate is less than a percentage point under the rate in 1985 and 1995. Homeownership Rates Over 30 Years | Keeping Current Matters

What Will the Future Bring?

In a Housing Wire article this week, Ed Stansfield who manages the housing market research at Capital Economics said:

“The homeownership rate fell further at the start of the year to a 22-year low of 63.7. However, with credit conditions now loosening and employment set to continue growing strongly, we suspect this long downward trend may not last for much longer.”

In the same article referenced above, Jonathan Smoke, chief economist for realtor.com, explained why the homeownership rate will probably begin to increase:

“The homeownership rate is likely to bottom this year or next not far from where we are now. By historical patterns, the rate could indeed go up. The simple math behind what it costs to rent versus buy shows that if you can afford the down payment and qualify for a mortgage, it is cheaper to buy rather than rent in 80% of the counties in the US now.”

Bottom Line

With interest rates and prices still below where experts predict, perhaps we should get together and evaluate your ability to purchase a home.

Source: www.keepingcurrentmatters.com

 

 

 

How to Qualify for a Mortgage When Your Income Isn’t Steady

Mortgage lenders love to see borrowers with consistent, steady incomes. But not all borrowers have jobs that send a paycheck every two weeks. Of course there are plenty of self-employed entrepreneurs, but there are also people who are depend on tips for income, those who get paid by contract and also individuals who work per diem or on call. All of these situations can make it very challenging to provide proof of the steady income that mortgage lenders adore.  Fortunately, those with more creative incomes can still qualify for a home loan and it is getting easier. For example, in recen...

October 10th, 2018 | Purchasing a Home, Conventional Loans, How to Qualify for a Mortgage When Your Income Isn’t Steady

What is a Piggyback Mortgage?

In order to achieve the dream of homeownership, many buyers look for creative financing to aid them in their quest. One such option is a piggyback mortgage, which actually involves taking out two separate loans to make homeownership more affordable. These loans can be very helpful, but borrowers must know the risks in order to be succesful. Piggyback Definition Here’s how a piggyback mortgage works. You take out a traditional home loan for 80% of the home purchase price. You put down 10% of your own cash as a downpayment. Then in order to cover the remaining 10%, you take out a sec...

September 12th, 2018 | First-time Homebuyers, Conventional Loans, Preapproval, Purchasing a Home, What is a Piggyback Mortgage?

Are Fixed Rate Mortgages or Adjustable Rate Mortgages better for me?

When you are in the market for a mortgage, one of the many decisions you’ll have to make is whether to apply for a fixed-rate loan or an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM). Both can be beneficial, depending on your situation. Learning the difference between them can ensure you get the right product for your financial goals. Fixed-Rate Mortgages Fixed-rate mortgages (FRMs) are just as their name suggests - loan with a fixed interest rate, a rate that never changes over the course of the mortgage. The obvious benefit of this type of loan is that your monthly payment, as well as your inte...

August 15th, 2018 | Purchasing a Home, Fixed Rate Mortgages, Adjustable Rate Mortgages, Refinancing a Home, Are Fixed Rate Mortgages or Adjustable Rate Mortgages better for me?

Should I Pay Mortgage Points?

If you are buying a home or refinancing, you have probably heard about “mortgage points.” This form of pre-paid interest can save you thousands of dollars over the course of your loan but in many circumstances is not worth the upfront cost. How do you know whether to pay points or not? Here’s a quick guide to help you figure it out. What are Mortgage Points? Mortgage points – also known as discount points - are essentially a way to pay some of the interest upfront on your home loan. One point is equal to 1% of your mortgage amount. For example, one point on a $100...

July 18th, 2018 | Purchasing a Home, Interest Rates, Should I Pay Mortgage Points?

4 Things Every Borrower Needs to Know About Mortgage Brokers

Buying a home in California, whether for the first time or the last, is an exciting event. Yet before you even take a look at a single home for sale, it is a smart idea to have your mortgage financing lined up. While it is possible to get a home loan directly with your local credit union or bank, the most common mortgage-makers are mortgage brokers. If you are ready to apply for a home loan, here are 4 things you need to know about mortgage brokers before starting the process. A broker is a middleman Mortgage brokers act as go-betweens for you and many different potential lenders. Instead o...

June 20th, 2018 | mortgage brokers, 4 Things Every Borrower Needs to Know About Mortgage Brokers

Global Funding Service Corporation

19800 MacArthur Blvd #1100
Irvine, California 92612
Phone: 323-947-4134
Fax: 562-684-4099
Email: gabriel@globalfundingcorp.net
NMLS: 342955

CAL BRE: 01727991